Black Women, Black Music, Black Feminism - Nina Simone


Nina Simone

Four Women

My skin is black
My arms are long
Strong enough to take the pain
inflicted again and again
What do they call me
My name is AUNT SARAH
What do they call me
My name is SAFFRONIA
What do they call me
My name is SWEET THING
What do they call me
My name is SWEET THING
What do they call me
My name is PEACHES

A song on four Black Women, by Nina Simone. Undeniably one of the greatest songs in the History of Jazz Music. ‘Aunty Sara’, once a slave is now very old. ‘Saffronia’ is uncertain whether she is White or Black! A daughter born out of rape to a Black Woman by a White man. One who exists outlandishly between White and Black. ‘Sweet Thing’ is the call name given to 'that' hooker by her clients. She doesn’t require to remember her real name and herself. ‘Peaches’ is the daughter of a slave couple. She is rude, arrogant and what not!

Simone sings with so much emotion and at the end of the song she spits out the word “Peaches”. Only an artist who has lived her art could perform that act. This song is a narrative on the life of Black Women then. A simple straightforward song, humble arrangements, no embellishments. This song deserves to stand together with the Poem “Harlem Sweeties” by Langston Hughes. He relates the beauty of Black Women to the luscious fruits and desserts. Brown Sugar, Peaches, Caramel, Walnut – Witty but subtle and joyful imagery on the Pride of Black Women. Praising Black women and reassuring them to celebrate their vivacity and vibrancy. And the poet indeed has hidden something beneath. “Cast your gims, On this sepia thrill”. He might have referred to Gimlet (Piercing Eyes) of a Black woman. How Hughes had used the term Gims, Simone had spitted the word Peaches in her Song!

Attachments area